I supposed it was merely to do something toward raising the flag. It was that which gave promise that in due time the weight would be lifted from the shoulders of all men. Primary Source: Lincoln's Address at Independence Hall (1861) On Abraham Lincoln's inaugural journey to Washington as president-elect, he stopped in Philadelphia at the site where the Declaration of Independence had been signed. In another year, the assassinated President’s remains would ceremoniously, somberly return to Independence Hall to lay in state, before a final trip to Springfield, Illinois. I am not in favor of such a course, and I may say in advance, there will be no blood shed unless it be forced upon the Government. Mr. Cuyler: I am filled with deep emotion at finding myself standing here, in this place, where were collected together the wisdom, the patriotism, the devotion to principle, from which sprang the institutions under which we live. There is no necessity for it. I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence. Second Lecture on Discoveries and Inventions, 1859, Addresses to the New Jersey Senate/General Assembly, 1861, The Political Evolution of Abraham Lincoln, Tragedy in the White House: Willy Lincoln's Death. I can say in return, Sir, that all the political sentiments I entertain have been drawn, so far as I have been able to Declaration of Independence which gave liberty, not alone to the people of this country, but, I hope, to the world, for all future time. I have often inquired of myself, what great principle or idea it was that kept this Confederacy so long together. If it cannot be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful. Lincoln visited Philadelphia one more time—to support fundraising efforts for Army Hospitals in June, 1864. I am not in favor of such a course, and I may say, in advance, that there will be no bloodshed unless it be forced upon the I did not expect to be called upon to say a word when I came here—I supposed I was merely to do something towards raising a flag. one of the more memorable stops occurred at Independence Hall in Philadelphia on George Washington’s birthday, February 22. I can say in return, Sir, that all the political sentiments I entertain have been drawn, so far as I have been able to draw them, from the sentiments which originated and were given to the world from this hall. It was not the mere matter of the separation of the Colonies from the motherland; but that sentiment in the Declaration of Independence which gave liberty, not alone to the people of this country, but, I hope, to the world, for all future time. This is a sentiment embodied in the Declaration of Independence. I have often inquired of myself what great principle or idea it was that kept this Confederacy so long together. My friends, this is wholly an unexpected speech, and I did not expect to be called upon to say a word when I came here. This is a sentiment embodied in the Declaration of Independence. There is no necessity for it. one of the more memorable stops occurred at Independence Hall in Philadelphia on George Washington’s birthday, February 22. Government, and then it will be compelled to act in self-defence. ABRAHAM LINCOLN Address in Independence Hall February 22, 1861. What would Abe Lincoln think about our times. But if this country cannot be saved without giving up that principle, I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender it. But, if this country cannot be saved without giving up that principle—I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot than to surrender it. I may, therefore, have said something indiscreet. I supposed it was merely to do something toward raising the flag. All Rights Reserved. (Cries of "No, no") I have said nothing but what I am willing to live by and, if it be the pleasure of Almighty God, die by. over the dangers which were incurred by the men who assembled here, and framed and adopted that Declaration of Independence. If it can’t be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful. Now, my friends, can this country be saved upon that basis? I may, therefore, have said something indiscreet, but I have said nothing but what I am willing to live by, and, in the pleasure of Almighty God, die by. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania February 22, 1861. Source: Neely, Mark E. Jr. 1982. Read Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address "Fellow countrymen: at this second appearing to take the oath of the presidential office there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Independence. It was that which gave promise that in due time the weight would be lifted from the shoulders of Now, my friends, can this country be saved upon that basis? suggested to me that in my hands is the task of restoring peace to the present distracted condition of the country. The building houses government offices, including the Independence legislative body, and provides public records, government services, and information about Independence services. Abraham Lincoln > Speech at Independence Hall Mr. Cuyler:–I am filled with deep emotion at finding myself standing here in the place where were collected together the wisdom, the patriotism, the devotion to principle, from which sprang the institutions under which we live. Source: Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, edited by Roy P. Basler. I have often pondered over the dangers which were incurred by the men who assembled here, and framed and adopted that Declaration of Independence. all men. Address at Independence Hall, February 22, 1861 The inaugural journey began in Springfield on February 11 and ended in Washington D. C. on February 23, 1861. cannot be saved upon that principle, it will be truly awful.

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